September 6, 2005
News Release 05-100
Contact: Peg O'Laughlin, 202-205-1819

SHARA L. ARANOFF SWORN IN AS U.S. INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSIONER

Shara L. Aranoff, a Democrat of Maryland, was sworn in today as a Commissioner of the U.S. International Trade Commission. She was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on July 29, 2005, for the term expiring on December 16, 2012.

Prior to her appointment, Commissioner Aranoff was Senior International Trade Counsel on the Democratic staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance, where she was responsible for legislative and policy issues on international trade and investment, including the Trade Act of 2002; negotiations involving the World Trade Organization, the Free Trade Area of the Americas, and numerous free trade agreements; trade remedy laws; Trade Adjustment Assistance; and trade- related environment and labor issues.

From June 1993 until her Senate Finance Committee appointment in January 2001, she served as an Attorney-Advisor in the Office of the General Counsel at the U.S. International Trade Commission.

Earlier in her career, Commissioner Aranoff was an Associate at the Washington, DC, law firm of Steptoe & Johnson, specializing in international trade and public international law. Prior to that, she served as a judicial clerk for the Honorable Herbert P. Wilkins, Associate Justice, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

Commissioner Aranoff holds a bachelor of arts degree from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. She received her J.D. from Harvard Law School. She attended the Institut Universitaire de Hautes Etudes Internationales at the University of Geneva in Geneva, Switerzland, as a Fulbright Scholar from 1984-1985.

Commissioner Aranoff is originally from Framingham, Massachusetts. She is married to David Korn, has two children, and resides in Bethesda, Maryland.

The U.S. International Trade Commission is an independent, nonpartisan, factfinding federal agency that provides trade expertise to both the legislative and executive branches of government, determines the impact of imports on U.S. industries, and directs actions against certain unfair trade practices, such as patent, trademark, and copyright infringement.

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