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NEWS RELEASE 98-074; OCTOBER 7, 1998 October 7, 1998
News Release 98-074
Invs. Nos. 332-227 and 332-352

ITC FINDS IMPACT OF CBERA AND ATPA IMPORTS NEGLIGIBLE

The overall effect of imports under the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and the Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA) on the U.S. economy and consumers continued to be negligible in 1997, reports the U.S. International Trade Commission.

The ITC, an independent, nonpartisan, factfinding federal agency, recently issued its annual reports monitoring imports under the two programs in a single publication. This year's reports examine trends in U.S. trade with beneficiaries from the implementation of each program until 1997.

The CBERA program, operative since January 1, 1984, affords preferential tariff treatment to most products of 24 designated Caribbean, Central American, and South American countries. The ATPA program, signed into law in December 1991, affords preferential tariff treatment to most products of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. These four Andean countries are the source of the coca plants from which most of the world's cocaine is produced or are major transit areas for cocaine. The ATPA's goal is to promote the development of sustainable economic alternatives to drug crop production by offering alternative, legal Andean products broader access to the U.S. market.

Following are highlights of the reports, Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act: Impact on U.S. Industries and Consumers, Thirteenth Report, 1997 and Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on U.S. Industries and Consumers and on Drug Crop Eradication and Crop Substitution, Fifth Report, 1997:

Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act: Impact on U.S. Industries and Consumers, Thirteenth Report, 1997 and Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on U.S. Industries and Consumers and on Drug Crop Eradication and Crop Substitution, Fifth Report, 1997 (Invs. Nos. 332-227 and 332-352, USITC Publication No. 3132, September 1998) will be available on the ITC's Internet server at www.usitc.gov. The publication will also be available at federal depository libraries in the United States and on a future edition of the Department of Commerce's National Trade Data Bank. A printed copy may be requested by calling 202-205-1809 or by writing to the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20436. Requests may also be faxed to 202-205-2104.

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